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Narshi Family Collection

Narshi Family Collection

The Santiago Cross
Private Collection
22 May 2019

The Santiago Cross: Invisible Trade, recontexualises images drawn from the stop-frame   animation component of the To be King installation through the lens of 'trade'.   “Invisible trade, in economics, the exchange of physically intangible items between   countries. Invisible trade can be distinguished from visible trade, which involves the   export, import, and re-export of physically tangible goods.”   https://www.britannica.com/topic/invisible-trade

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1. The Smithsonian Museum of African Art

1. The Smithsonian Museum of African Art

Museum, University Gallery, Private Collection
30 Nov 2010

Even in the Long Descent I – V Etching and mezzotint on paper Each panel 1 165 x 695mm

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The Iziko National Gallery

The Iziko National Gallery

Museum, University Gallery, Private Collection
30 Nov 2002

Collections: The Iziko National Gallery of South Africa Rhodes University Collection The Jack Ginsberg Art CollectionCollections: The Iziko National Gallery of South Africa Rhodes University Collection The Jack Ginsberg Art CollectionWhile I was working towards my exhibition, FrontTears (1997) I came across a small, faded photograph of my grandfather. He looks about five or six years old, it was taken in 1915, the beginning of the First World War. He is standing in a suburban living room in Graaf-Reinet, Eastern Cape, South Africa. The glare of the Karoo light or maybe just the bleached quality of the photograph makes him appear spectral. He is holding a toy wooden gun over his shoulder and is standing to attention. What captured me, when I saw this photograph, was the look on his face, he looks off into the distance, old beyond his years.     

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2. The New York Public Library

2. The New York Public Library

The Terrain Thresholds
Museum, Private Collection, Corporate Collection
30 Nov 1998

Thresholds 1997, Eleven works in the series. 6 prints 300 x 400mm. 5 prints 350 x 260mm, Edition 20. Christine Dixie's work is concerned with landscape. However, it is also interested in the relationship between vision, surveillance, and trauma. Instead of the azure distances and aerial perspective we find in topographical illustration, her printmaking offers a different view of gendered, threshold spaces. (David Bunn, 1998) Collections:  The New York Public Library The Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum Sanlam Art Collection Further Reading: Bunn, D. 2007  A Sidelong Glance: Christine Dixie’s Thresholds. Corporeal Prospects catalogue. Johannesburg, Standard Bank Gallery Exhibition Schmahmann, B. 2004  ‘Enactments’, in Through the Looking Glass: Representations of Self by South African Woman Artists. David Krut Publishers, Johannesburg

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